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Home News Latest Man ordered to stand trial for attempted murder of Clearlake Police officer

Man ordered to stand trial for attempted murder of Clearlake Police officer

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Daniel Alan York, 53, of Clearlake, Calif., has been ordered to stand trial on charges including attempted for allegedly ramming a vehicle into a police officer on Sunday, September 22, 2013. Lake County Jail photo.

LAKEPORT, Calif. – On Thursday a judge ordered a Clearlake man to stand trial for the attempted murder of a Clearlake Police officer in September.

Daniel Alan York, 53, was held to answer following his Thursday morning preliminary hearing, according to Senior Deputy District Attorney Art Grothe.

Early on the morning of Sunday, Sept. 22, York is alleged to have used his SUV to ram Clearlake Police Officer Tom Riley, who pulled York over at Redbud Park, as Lake County News has reported.

Police said York put his SUV in reverse and slammed into Riley, pinning him up against a Ford pickup and seriously injuring the officer, who was flown to Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital.

York is facing felony charges, including attempted murder, assault with a deadly weapon, obstructing or resisting a peace officer, hit and run, vandalism and vehicle theft, and a misdemeanor for failing to register as a controlled substances offender, along with special allegations of vandalism, personal use of a deadly weapon and inflicting great bodily injury.

The District Attorney's Office has estimated that, if convicted, York could face at least 35 years to life in state prison, in part because of a series of previous strikes and prison terms.

Court records showed that York has been convicted of eight felonies in cases stretching back to 1981.

His convictions include bringing drugs into a prison or jail facility and burglary in Alameda County; assault with a firearm and burglary in Lake County; burglary in Nevada County; and burglary, vehicle theft and possession of materials with the intent to manufacture illegal drugs in Sonoma County. The Lake and Nevada county convictions are serious or violent felonies.

Those eight felony convictions also led to York serving seven prior prison terms, according to court records.

York remains in the Lake County Jail, with bail set at $1 million.

Email Elizabeth Larson at [email protected] . Follow her on Twitter, @ERLarson, or Lake County News, @LakeCoNews.

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Marzocco
Our utopian legal system
written by Marzocco, October 26, 2013
CA has a 3-strikes law. He should have been slapped with at least a quarter by the last judge he faced. The revolving-door judiciary has not only failed us, but also the cops who face these recidivist violent offenders on a daily basis. Someone with such small regard for the life of others can best 'serve the community' by making license plates in the company of others of his ilk.

@guest. Judges are not mandated to apply the 3rd Strike law. They have the discretion to enforce it or no. Don't get me wrong I still consider our judicial system one of the best in the world but because our laws are created and enforced by people it is not infallible.

During my 25 years in law enforcement I had to testify in court from simple traffic violations to spending weeks in court being grilled about my investigations related to rape, murder, and other violent crimes. And many times I wondered why judges and juries would reach their conclusions.

Then, after retiring, I worked for 3 years in the Marin County Superior court as a part time bailiff. And that job opened my eyes. Standing in court while the defense attorney, the DA and probation wheeled and dealed. All regular, all above the law, all within the rules dictated by our judicial system. The reasons for this? Each crime is different and the law cannot be applied blindly. Or, if they didn't have this filtering system we would need to built twice as much the number of prisons we have now.
Right? Wrong? Who knows. My problem is that the end result many times doesn't take in consideration the rights of the victims. Or the fact that too many criminals cannot be rehabilitated and cannot function in our society. So letting them free among us and hope they will behave is only utopia.
Marzocco
...
written by Marzocco, October 26, 2013
How about sentencing him to prison for a set time and then a life of service to the community at large to recoup some of the expense of continual catching, processing and incarceration of this miserable example of a "citizen".

@ Monitor. Isn't what you describe the same as probation or parole? Isn't what you describe what this POS has been doing for the last decade or more? And what are the results? Law abiding people and police placed at risk because people like this POS believes he is above the law and can do anything he feels is right. These kind of criminals cannot be changed or rehabilitated as much as trying to fix a rabid dog.
In order to prevent this POS from committing crimes while "in the community at large to recoup the expenses " he would have to be monitored 24/7 which would cost us the same as him being in prison.
Rex
WTH?
written by a guest, October 25, 2013
CA has a 3-strikes law. He should have been slapped with at least a quarter by the last judge he faced. The revolving-door judiciary has not only failed us, but also the cops who face these recidivist violent offenders on a daily basis. Someone with such small regard for the life of others can best 'serve the community' by making license plates in the company of others of his ilk.

(On November 6, 2012 the voters approved Proposition 36 which substantially amended the law with two primary provisions:
the requirements for sentencing a defendant as a third strike offender were changed to 25 years to life by requiring the new felony to be a serious or violent felony with two or more prior strikes to qualify for the 25 year-to-life sentence as a third strike offender...)

That's two would-be cop killers this week. Judges, why do they walk among us when they've plainly chosen lives of crime? You have the mandate to lock them up. Do you have the tackle?
monitor
Career criminal?
written by monitor, October 25, 2013
Wow, what to do w/ a guy like this? He's only 53- could we keep him in lock up for another 30-40 years and at what cost? It seems that jail doesn't do much to deter him. And he is only one of many.
It's obvious that he has forfeited his right to live among us. How about sentencing him to prison for a set time and then a life of service to the community at large to recoup some of the expense of continual catching, processing and incarceration of this miserable example of a "citizen".

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Last Updated ( Friday, 25 October 2013 02:33 )