Tuesday, 28 June 2022

Community

On Thursday, House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force Chairman Rep. Mike Thompson (CA-05) lauded Judiciary Committee passage of H.R. 7910, Protecting Our Kids Act.

This gun violence prevention legislation co-authored by Chairman Thompson includes common sense measures supported by the American people that will help end gun violence and save lives.

The Protecting Our Kids Act is expected to come to the House floor next week for a vote.

“The passage of the Protecting Our Kids Act today by the House Judiciary Committee is an important step forward to help end gun violence,” said Thompson. “By cracking down on gun trafficking, ghost guns and bump stocks, raising the age to purchase certain firearms, strengthening safe gun storage rules, and banning large capacity magazines often used in mass shootings, we can help keep our communities safe and save lives. I look forward to voting on this legislation when it comes to the floor next week and I will continue to do everything in my power to enact common sense gun laws that our nation wants and our country desperately needs.”

Earlier this week, House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force Chairman Rep. Mike Thompson (CA-05), House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (NY-10) and House Judiciary Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security Subcommittee Chairwoman, Sheila Jackson Lee (TX-18) introduced H.R. 7910, Protecting Our Kids Act.

The House Judiciary Committee passed H.R. 7910, the Protecting Our Kids Act, on Thursday by a vote of 25 to 19.

H.R. 7910 would:

• Raise the lawful age to purchase a semiautomatic centerfire rifle from 18 to 21 years old.
• Establish a new federal offense for the import, sale, manufacture, transfer, or possession of a large capacity magazine, with exceptions for certain law enforcement uses and the possession (but not sale) of grandfathered magazines; allow state and local governments to use the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant Program to compensate individuals who surrender large capacity magazines through a buyback program.
• Establish new federal offenses for gun trafficking and straw purchasers and authorize seizure of the property and proceeds of the offense.
• Establish voluntary best practices for safe firearm storage and award grants for Safe Firearm Storage Assistance Programs.
• Establish requirements to regulate the storage of firearms on residential premises; create criminal penalties for violation of the requirements
• Build on ATF’s regulatory bump stock ban by listing bump stocks under the National Firearms Act and statutorily banning the manufacture, sale, or possession of bump stocks for civilian use.
• Build on ATF’s regulatory ban of ghost guns by ensuring that ghost guns are subject to existing federal firearm regulation by amending the definition of “firearm” to include gun kits and partial receivers and changing the definition of “manufacturing firearms” to include assembling firearms using 3D printing.

Following the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School, then-Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi appointed Rep. Mike Thompson Chairman of the House Gun Violence Prevention Task Force. This group, consisting of more than 185 Members of Congress, is devoted to finding common sense solutions to our nation’s ongoing gun violence epidemic.

LAKEPORT, Calif. — Sterling Shore Mobile Home Estates will host its annual yard sale on Friday, June 3, and Saturday, June 4.

Hours will be 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.

There will be a great selection of household, shop and garden goods.

Sterling Shore Park is located at 5830 Robin Hill Drive. Take exit 108 off Highway 29 onto Lakeshore Boulevard and turn into Robin Hill Drive and follow to the end.

Despite the dry year, outdoor recreationists who enjoy California rivers and streams should remain aware of dangerously cold, swiftly moving water.

Although California’s snowpack is well below normal, snow is melting and filling streams and rivers.

Pacific Gas and Electric Co. urges those who venture near or into water to take extra precautions, especially around hydroelectric facilities and dams, where flow conditions can change rapidly. With trout season largely open, anglers also are encouraged to take precautions.

“Safety is PG&E’s most important responsibility. We encourage everyone recreating in or near water to plan at all times how they can quickly and safely escape in case of changing water flows and cold temperatures,” said Jan Nimick, PG&E vice president of Power Generation.

Most California rivers are fed by snowmelt, making them cold even in summer. Simple actions can save lives, such as recognizing if the water is too cold or swift, knowing your limits, wearing a life jacket or simply by not entering the water when conditions seem unsafe.

Below are some water safety tips.

Stay out and stay alive — stay out of canals and flumes

Recreating in PG&E canals and flumes is strictly prohibited. Stay off of elevated flumes and out of these water conveyances, regardless of who owns them, as they are dangerous due to slippery sides and fast-moving cold water.

Be mindful of signs and warnings. Stay out of areas that are posted as restricted, fenced-off or buoy-lined.

Know the risks

• Prevention is the best way to save a person from drowning. By the time a person is struggling in the water, a rescue is extremely unlikely and places the rescuer at risk.
• Sudden immersion in cold water can stimulate the “gasp reflex,” causing an involuntary inhalation of air or water. It can even trigger cardiac arrest, temporary paralysis, hypothermia and drowning. When faced with swift water, even the strongest swimmers can be easily overwhelmed.
• Cold water entering the ear canal can cause vertigo and disorientation. This can confuse swimmers, potentially causing them to venture deeper into the water.
• Cold water also reduces body heat 25 to 30 times faster than air does at the same temperature and causes impairment that can be fatal.

Learn about self-rescue techniques

If you do fall into the water, here are some survival tips:

• Don’t panic. Try to control your breathing; don’t gasp. A sudden, unexpected fall into cold water causes an involuntary gasp (or torso) reflex. It takes less than one-half cup of water in a person’s lungs to drown. If you remain calm, you have a greater chance of self-rescue.
• If you have a boat, stay with it. It will help you stay afloat and will be seen more easily by rescuers. If it’s capsized and a portion of the craft is above water, try to climb on top.
• Stay afloat with the help of a life jacket, regain control of your breathing and keep your head above water in view of rescuers.
• If possible, remove heavy shoes. Look for ways to increase buoyancy such as by holding onto seat cushions or an ice chest.
• If you’re in the water with others, huddle together facing each other to help everyone stay afloat and keep warm.
• If you do fall into a river without a life jacket, keep your feet pointed downstream and turn onto your back.
• If you fall into the water with waders on, roll onto the shore. Wear a belt with waders.

Know your limits

• Swimming in open water is more difficult than in a swimming pool — people tire more quickly and can get into trouble.
• Many unseen obstacles can be lurking below the water’s surface — this is especially the case during spring and early summer snowmelt. Rising water can make these obstacles even more treacherous. Guided trips for inexperienced paddlers are recommended.

Wear a Coast Guard-approved life jacket

Conditions change quickly in open water and even the best swimmers can misjudge the water and their skills when boating or swimming.

Adult supervision

Actively supervise children in and around open bodies of water, giving them your undivided attention. Do not assume that someone is watching them. Appoint a designated “water watcher,” taking turns with other adults. Use the buddy system and never swim alone.

Dr. Glenn Benjamin giving tea party participants carriage rides around his farm pulled by his Percheron horses. Courtesy photo.

LAKE COUNTY, Calif. — On Tuesday, May 17, Dana Di Ricco Benjamin and Dr. Glenn Benjamin welcomed members and guests of the Clear Lake Trowel and Trellis Garden Club to their beautiful ranch in Upper Lake for the club's spring tea celebration.

The weather was perfect and attendees were treated to tours of the hosts' gardens of colorful blooms and eye-catching statues and their state-of-the-art horse barn that houses their award-winning Percherons.

As the tea started guests were seated at tables under the ample shade of the large trees that dotted the freshly mowed lawn.

All of the nine tables were covered with crisp white tablecloths and set with the finest bone china and freshly polished silverware. Each table sported artfully arranged floral bouquets.

In addition, because the event was a tea party, each table was further festooned with its own silver tea set. Yes, it was fancy!

And so were the attendees. The women wore their “Sunday best” and several donned festive-looking hats that would have fit in quite nicely at a Churchill Downs racing event. Even the men in attendance seemed to be “styling” a bit in honor of the occasion.

No tea party would have been complete with the requisite little sandwiches (no crusts, please) and sweet treats commonly served at high tea events, and garden club members extended their creative culinary cunning in making delicious dozens of each which were relished by all.

To add even more flavor to the afternoon, at the end of the tea attendees caught a glimpse of Dr. Glenn Benjamin and his “footman” in a white carriage pulled by a pair of snow white horses as they made their way toward the front of the house where they stopped.

Of course, many hurried over to admire the horses more closely. Some even got to take a short ride in the carriage!

A short time later, festivities at the tea continued when Dana Benjamin presented the gathering with a huge cake which we all shared in devouring with gusto as we participated in a gift exchange and final raffle.

At the end of the afternoon, there was no doubt in anyone's mind that they had all shared some wonderful and memorable moments together and would be looking forward to the tea next year.

Membership in the Clear Lake Trowel and Trellis Garden Club is open to all those who have an interest in gardening. They would like to share a cup of tea with you at our annual tea next spring, or during any of our monthly meetings.

Please call club President Carol Dobush at 707-279-1169 for information. The club is a member of the Mendo-Lake District of the California Garden Club Inc.-Pacific Region and National Garden Clubs Inc.

NORTH‌‌ ‌‌COAST, ‌‌ ‌‌Calif. —‌ Caltrans‌‌ ‌‌reports‌‌ ‌‌that‌‌ ‌‌the‌‌ ‌‌following‌‌ ‌‌road‌‌ ‌‌projects‌‌ ‌‌will‌‌ ‌‌be‌‌ ‌‌taking‌‌ ‌‌place‌‌ ‌‌‌around‌‌ ‌‌the‌‌ ‌‌North‌‌ ‌‌Coast‌‌ ‌‌during‌‌ ‌‌the‌‌ ‌‌coming‌‌ ‌‌week. ‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌
‌‌‌ ‌
Included‌‌ ‌‌are‌‌ ‌‌Mendocino‌‌ ‌‌County‌‌ ‌‌projects‌‌ ‌‌that‌‌ ‌‌may‌‌ ‌‌impact‌‌ ‌‌Lake‌‌ ‌‌County‌‌ ‌‌commuters, as well as work in Del Norte and Humboldt counties.
‌‌‌ ‌
Caltrans‌‌ ‌‌advises‌‌ ‌‌motorists‌‌ ‌‌to‌‌ ‌‌drive‌‌ ‌‌with‌‌ ‌‌caution‌‌ ‌‌when‌‌ ‌‌approaching‌‌ ‌‌work‌‌ ‌‌areas‌‌ ‌‌and‌‌ ‌‌to‌‌ ‌‌be‌‌ ‌‌‌prepared‌‌ ‌‌to‌‌ ‌‌stop‌‌ ‌‌at‌‌ ‌‌traffic‌‌ ‌‌control‌‌ ‌‌stations. ‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌
‌‌‌ ‌
The‌‌ ‌‌Caltrans‌‌ ‌‌Traffic‌‌ ‌‌Operations‌‌ ‌‌Office‌‌ ‌‌has‌‌ ‌‌reviewed‌‌ ‌‌each‌‌ ‌‌project‌‌ ‌‌and‌‌ ‌‌determined‌‌ ‌‌that‌‌ ‌‌individual‌‌ ‌‌‌project‌‌ ‌‌delays‌‌ ‌‌are‌‌ ‌‌expected‌‌ ‌‌to‌‌ ‌‌be‌‌ ‌‌less‌‌ ‌‌than‌‌ ‌‌the‌‌ ‌‌statewide‌‌ ‌‌policy‌‌ ‌‌maximum‌‌ ‌‌of‌‌ ‌‌30‌‌ ‌‌minutes‌‌ ‌‌unless‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌noted‌‌ ‌‌otherwise. ‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌

Caltrans will suspend most work on Northern California highways from Friday, May 27, through Monday, May 30, in observance of Memorial Day weekend. However, in the case of unforeseen circumstances, it may be necessary for Caltrans crews to respond to emergency situations.

For‌‌ ‌‌updates‌‌ ‌‌to‌‌ ‌‌this‌‌ ‌‌list‌‌ ‌‌check‌‌ ‌‌QuickMap‌‌ ‌‌at‌‌ ‌‌‌www.dot.ca.gov‌‌‌ or‌‌ ‌‌1-800-GAS-ROAD‌‌ ‌‌‌(1-800-427-7623). ‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌

LAKE‌‌ ‌‌COUNTY‌‌ ‌‌‌ ‌
‌‌‌ ‌
Highway‌‌ ‌‌29

— Road work continues near Hidden Valley Lake at Spruce Grove Road. Lane closures will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Motorists should expect five-minute delays.

MENDOCINO COUNTY

Highway 1

— Emergency Road work continues in Westport from Blue Slide Gulch to Pacific Avenue. Lane closures will be in effect from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists should expect five-minute delays.

Highway 20

— Guardrail work in Willits west of the 101 Jct will continue. One-way traffic control will be in place from 6 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. Motorists should expect up to 10-minute delays.

Highway 101

— Slide removal at Pieta Creek Bridge will continue. Northbound Lane closures will be in effect. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

— Fence work at the East Perkins Street Overcrossing in Ukiah will begin on Tuesday, May 31. Lane closures will be in effect from 6:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. weekdays. Motorists should expect minor slowdowns through the area.

— Moss Cove Safety Rest Area will be closed through July 2022.

— Empire Camp Safety Rest Area will be closed through July 2022.

Highway 162

— Road work south of Dos Rios near the Rodeo Creek Bridge continues. One-way traffic control will be in effect from 3 p.m. to 7 a.m. weeknights. Motorists should expect up to 10-minute delays.

Highway 271

— Slide removal continues south of Piercy near Reynolds State Park Road. A lane closure is in effect and motorists should use an alternate route.

DEL NORTE COUNTY

Highway 101

— Construction work from the Route 169 junction to north of Klamath will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Bridge work north of Klamath near Old Hunter Creek Road will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Construction in the Last Chance Grade area will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect. Motorists should anticipate 25-minute delays at all hours.

— Bridge work at Rowdy Creek will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate minor slowdowns.

Highway 199

— Construction work near Kings Valley Road will begin on Tuesday, May 31. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Bridge work at Hiouchi Bridge will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate minor slowdowns.

— Permitted cleanup and repair work between Hiouchi and Gasquet will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

— Bridge work from Mary Adam Peacock Bridge to Wagon Wheel Cafe will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate minor slowdowns.

— Bridge work at Middle Fork Smith River Bridge will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate minor slowdowns.

HUMBOLDT COUNTY

Highway 36

— Permitted utility work 1.5 miles west of Abe Wouk Memorial Grove Road will occur on Wednesday, June 1. One-way traffic control will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

— Permitted utility work at Private Road will occur on Thursday, June 2. One-way traffic control will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

— Construction work from Buck Mountain Road to the Trinity County line will continue. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Bridge work south of Phillipsville will continue. Lane closures will be in effect weekdays. Motorists should anticipate minor traffic slowdowns. A northbound onramp closure will also be in effect. Motorists should use an alternate route.

— Part of The Kinetic Grand Championship will take place on Sunday, May 29. A lane closure between the Herrick Avenue Overcrossing and Tompkins Hill Road will be in effect from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

— Construction from the Herrick Avenue Overcrossing to Washington Street in Eureka will continue. Lane closures will be in effect in both directions from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. weeknights. A full lane closure is currently in effect at Washington Street. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Construction from the St Louis Road Overcrossing to Mad River Bridge will continue. Lane closures will be in effect from 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays. Starting May 31 at 9 p.m. a full ramp closure will be in effect at the Route 101/299 Junction. Motorists should choose an alternative route.

— Construction work from Murray Road Overcrossing to Georgia Pacific Road will begin on Tuesday, May 31. One-way traffic control will be in effect weekdays from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

Highway 169

— Permitted utility at Private Road will occur on Friday, June 3. One-way traffic will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Motorists should expect five-minute delays.

Highway 211

— Part of The Kinetic Grand Championship will take place on Monday, May 30. A full closure between Ocean Avenue and Eel River Drive will be in effect from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

Highway 254

— Permitted utility work south of Bear Creek Bridge will occur on Thursday, June 2. One-way traffic will be in effect from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Motorists should expect five-minute delays.

Highway 255

— Part of The Kinetic Grand Championship will take place on Saturday, May 28. One-way traffic control between Jackson Ranch Road and Dean Avenue will be in effect from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Motorists should anticipate 10-minute delays.

— Permitted utility work between K and V streets will begin on Wednesday, May 1. One-way traffic will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays. A full closure will also be in effect at the K Street intersection. Motorists should expect minor traffic slowdowns.

Highway 299

— Construction near Route 200 will continue. Lane closures will be in effect from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays. Motorists should expect minor traffic slowdowns.

— Paving east of Blue Lake will continue. The westbound offramp at the Truck Scale House will be closed. Motorists should use an alternate ramp.

— Construction east of the Burney Vista Point will continue. Motorists should anticipate five-minute delays.

CLEARLAKE, Calif. — Praises of Zion Baptist Church in Clearlake will be hosting a 12 Tribe yard sale on Friday, May 27, and Saturday, May 28, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

There will be a variety of new and used items. There will be a haircutting booth by a licensed cosmetologist. Get a great haircut for a minimum of a $10 donation.

There will be food, drinks and baked goods available, including hot dogs and spaghetti. Coffee and pastries are available for purchase in the morning.

There is ample parking and a playground under the trees for the children to use while you shop.

There is a 50/50 cash raffle and a raffle for a pingpong table. You need not be present to win.

This is a fundraiser for the building fund for a new church. Praises of Zion is located at 3890 Emile Ave (off Davis Street) Clearlake.

Check out the Facebook page at Praises of Zion Baptist Church Clearlake. Call 707 995-1319 for more information.

You can find more information about Praises of Zion on their website, www.praisesofzion.org.

Upcoming Calendar

28Jun
06.28.2022 9:00 am - 12:00 pm
Board of Supervisors
28Jun
06.28.2022 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Farmers' Market at Library Park
28Jun
06.28.2022 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
Rotary Club of Clear Lake
30Jun
06.30.2022 7:30 am - 8:30 am
Rotary Club of Middletown
1Jul
07.01.2022 5:00 pm - 5:30 pm
Essential workers mural dedication
2Jul
2Jul
07.02.2022 9:00 am - 11:00 am
Junior Ranger Program: Lake ecology
2Jul
07.02.2022 10:00 am - 1:00 pm
Farmers' Market at the Mercantile
2Jul
07.02.2022 11:00 am - 1:00 pm
Weekly writing workshop
2Jul
07.02.2022 11:00 am - 11:00 pm
64th annual Redbud Parade and Festival

Mini Calendar

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